Best Putters for Cross-handed Putting Review

Best Putters for Cross-handed Putting Review

If you’re a seasoned golfer, you’ve probably felt the need to experiment a little bit with your grip and try putting it cross-handed. You may have even found it helps you sink more putts. That said, the cross-handed grip has become more and more popular these days, and even PGA pros such as Jim Furyk and Jordan Spieth have been seen putt this way. With that in mind, we set out to make a best putters for cross-handed putting review to give some tips and alternatives. Of course, you may not agree with some of the choices, but that’s what wonderful about putting – it’s terrifically intimate (they don’t call putting green “the dance floor” for nothing).

What is Cross-Handed Putting?

On a more serious note, though, we should start by explaining what cross-handed putting grip, aka left hand low (if you’re right-hand-dominant), aka LHL, aka cracked grip is. Even if you’re not in the know, you can probably guess from reading the terms for it, especially the second one. If your dominant hand is your right hand, and you put your left hand below when gripping the club, then you’re putting cross-handed. 

Is there an advantage using this over conventional putting? Well, if your hands work too much through a stroke (wrists break down before the impact) or your right hand dominates the stroke, playing LHL might help. It will be awkward as hell at first, but soon enough you’ll notice that it stills your right hand and puts the majority of the workload on your arms and muscles, rather than hands.

What To Look For?

As for what features to look out for, there’s not really a definitive guidebook. Most LHL players have found that it helps if the putter is face balanced, and most, but not all mallet putters are like that. Also, a center-shafted putter will typically fall into this category, as well plumber’s neck or double bend ones, even if they’re heel shafted (if it weren’t for the bend, the neck would naturally connect to the head at or near the center).

If you’re not sure whether your flatstick is face-balanced or not, here’s a test you can apply. Take the club and literally balance it on your fingertip. If it’s drooping on the toe-side, it’s toe-balanced, but if the face remains parallel to the ground, you’ve got yourself a face balanced putter.

Best Putters for Cross-handed Putting Comparison Table

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Name

Pros

Cons

Rating

SeeMore Original Milled Series FGP Black Mallet Putter
  • Lots of feedback
  • Smooth rolls from any distance
  • Inexpensive
  • Not the most aesthetically pleasing flatstick
Callaway Odyssey O-Works #7 Putter
  • Good visual cues
  • Plenty of shaft options
  • Decent feedback
  • Not everyone will appreciate the fang style
Titleist Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2 Notchback Putter
  • Soft, buttery feel
  • Great for SBST strokes
  • Nice looks
  • Too pricey for what it offers
Cleveland TFI 2135 Mezzo Putter
  • Very reasonably priced
  • Good balance
  • Quite informative feedback
  • Some might find the looks rather too busy
Ping Karsten TR Anser 5 Putter

Ping Karsten TR Anser 5 Putter

  • Adjustable telescopic shaft
  • Plenty forgiving
  • Fairly muted feel
  • The adjustable shaft takes a bit of getting used to
Rife Switchback 2 Putter
  • Adjustable weights
  • Nice matte finish
  • Face-balanced
  • Not for players used to the classic Anser style
Odyssey Men’s White Hot RX 2-Ball V-Line Putter
  • Ridiculously easy to align
  • Full shaft offset
  • Inexpensive
  • Not everyone will like the 2-ball looks

Best Putters for Cross-handed Putting Review

To save you the trouble, we did an exhaustive (and at times exhausting) research and made a short list of what we believe are best putters for cross-handed golfing at the moment. Of course, we made sure to include a little bit of something for everyone and their pocket books. Enjoy the read!

SeeMore Original Milled Series FGP Black Mallet Putter

If you’re looking for a nice budget putter for cross-handed putting, then the SeeMore FGP might just be the thing for you. The flatstick comes in two distinct flavours – blade and mallet, but that’s pretty much where all the distinctions stop.

Both are milled (much like the rest of the SeeMore range), and both come with superb alignment system that SeeMore names RifleScope Technology. If you haven’t played with a SeeMore, here’s what this entails – there’s a red dot on the topline to the toe. All you have to do is hide the dot behind the shaft and then use the white sight line to align the putt.

The FGP weighs 355 grams in the head and is face-balanced, which should help appeal to LHL golfers. It comes with a straight shaft that enters the head close to center, so yes, you could consider it a center-shafted model – another feature that should theoretically help with a cracked grip.

Pros

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    Neither soft nor firm feel with lots of feedback
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    Smooth rolls from any distance
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    The RifleScope takes a lot of guesswork out of the alignment
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    The customer service is up to par (pun intended)​​​​
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    Plenty of customization options
  • thumbs-o-up
    Inexpensive

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not the most aesthetically pleasing flatstick you’ll see
Callaway Odyssey O-Works #7 Putter

The Callaway Odyssey O-Works #7 is a face-balanced mallet style putter with a double-bend shaft, which pretty much hits the trifecta of a great putter for cross-handed putting.

Of course, there’s more to the O-Works #7 than just hitting the mark we’ve set in the title.

Much like the rest of the O-Works family, this puppy features the innovative microhinge insert, which softens up the face and helps you get a better forward roll no matter where on the face you hit the ball. This, in turn, reduces the chance of skidding and help you dial-in the ball for a nice 2-putt.

Pros

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    Good visual cues
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    Plenty of shaft options (8)
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    Sounds nice and buttery at impact​​​​
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    Decent feedback
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    Smooth roll across the board

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not everyone will appreciate the fang style
Titleist Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2 Notchback Putter

Even if you’re a fan of Scotty Cameron, you’ll agree that sometimes his putters are way too pricey for what you get. That isn’t too say they’re not quality, quite the opposite, but one gets the feeling they’re paying more for the name than for the product.

Still, the Select Newport 2 Notchback is pretty much worth every penny you invest, especially if you’re looking for a quality LHL putter. Its double-bend shaft makes it nearly face-balanced, which makes for a rather versatile putter – it’s still better-suited to SBST strokes, but you can also play it with slight arc strokes.

The Notchback comes with additional 50 grams in the head and as much in the butt of the shaft, which goes a long way to stabilizing the swing and calming your hands. Coupled with the standard 38-inch shaft length, the design should appeal to anyone looking for enhanced forgiveness.

Pros

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    Soft, buttery feel
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    Great for SBST strokes
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    Plenty responsive, good feedback
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    Dual balance stabilizes the swing
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice looks

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Too pricey for what it offers
  • thumbs-o-down
    More forgiveness wouldn’t hurt anyone
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not for golfers used to the classic Anser look
Cleveland TFI 2135 Mezzo Putter

The Cleveland TFI 2135 Mezzo is a great choice for anyone looking for a putter for cross-handed golfing, but you’ll have to make sure to order it in the center-shafted flavour, as the stock option is heel-shafted.

The feature that makes the Mezzo stand apart from the competition is the copper-infused aluminum face that rests over a copolymer insert. The combo gives a nice soft feel without sacrificing any of the feedback. Plus, the copper gives a nice old-school look.

Appearance-wise, some would argue that there are too many colours that don’t really mix together. On the flipside, the visual cues are helpful and you’d have to be blind to not use them to good effect.

Pros

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    Very reasonably priced
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    Good balance
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    Quite informative feedback
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    Three shaft lengths to choose from
  • thumbs-o-up
    The visual cues inspire confidence at alignment

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might find the looks rather too busy

5. Ping Karsten TR Anser 5 Putter

Our Rating:

Ping Karsten TR Anser 5 Putter

Much like the rest of the family, the Anser 5 is available with either fixed-length or adjustable shaft. The latter allows you to set any length you prefer (between 31 and 38 inches) using the complimentary hex wrench.

Granted, adjusting the length takes a bit of finagling, but on the flipside, the ability to fine tune your putter’s length to your height and type of stroke is hardly unwelcome.

Another great feature is the TR technology, or True Roll milling – what Ping does is mill grooves of varying depth, the idea being that the ball speed is consistent irrespective of what part of the face you hit it with. This, in turn, gives you much tighter distance groupings, no matter the putting distance.

Pros

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    Adjustable telescopic shaft
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    Stable from the beginning to the end of each stroke
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    Consistent across the face
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    Plenty forgiving
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    Fairly muted feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    The copper finish gives it a nice classic look

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    The adjustable shaft takes a bit of getting used to

Our Rating:

Rife Switchback 2 Putter

The Rife Switchback comes in two distinct flavours, the vanilla Switchback with a straight shaft and the Switchback 2, which comes with a slight slant in the neck that makes it face-balanced.

What sets the Switchback 2 apart, in addition to the slant neck hosel, is the system of replaceable colour-coded weights (all come in pairs) – blue (5 grams each), red (10 grams each), charcoal (15 grams each), and silver (20 grams each). Notice any patterns? Out of the four, only the blue and silver come with the purchase, the other two are sold separately.

That way, you essentially have a putter weighing anywhere from 350 to 380 grams, allowing you to play all sorts of lies and strokes by adding or removing weight at need. Other than the two features, this is pretty much a traditional Anser style blade putter, though somewhat wider.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Adjustable weights
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    Nice matte finish
  • thumbs-o-up
    Face-balanced
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    Soft, velvety feel
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    Smooth, tight roll across the board
  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonably priced

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not for players used to the classic Anser style
Odyssey Men’s White Hot RX 2-Ball V-Line Putter

Much like the rest of the White Hot RX family, the 2-Ball V-Line comes with the eponymous insert that gives it a bit firmer sound and feel at impact. This should appeal to those players looking for a bit more feedback on their putts.

What makes this puppy one of the best LHL putters, however, is its face-balanced design (full shaft offset with a double bend hosel), which works great with the excellent visual cues that make alignment a breeze.

If for any reason you don’t like the 2-Ball design, but still want a putter for cross-handed putting, you can always check out the Odyssey Works Versa #7 and Works V-Line Versa. Sure, they’re older models, but you can order well-restored clubs for reasonable price through the Callaway pre-owned program

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Ridiculously easy to align
  • thumbs-o-up
    Somewhat heavier head
  • thumbs-o-up
    Full shaft offset
  • thumbs-o-up
    Available for left-handed golfers
  • thumbs-o-up
    Inexpensive

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not everyone will like the 2-ball looks
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not for those who prefer a soft feel

The Final Word

The bottom line seems to never change, no matter what the topic is – the most important thing you want to do when shopping for a new flatstick is seeing if it helps you shave a couple of strokes off your putt game. That’s it – no science, no specs or features, just the feel.

However… what we can do is help you zero in on as few potential clubs as possible. So, to recap – if you’re looking for the best putter for cross-handed golfing, what you’ll want to look out for is whether it’s face balanced. Straight center shaft or long shaft with plumber’s neck is usually a good indication the thing you’re looking at is face-balanced. Good luck on the putting greens!

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Ryan S

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