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Best Putters for Yips Review

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Best Putters for Yips Review

The yips, aka the jerks, aka the staggers, aka whiskey fingers have plagued golfers since the dawn of this sport. Some have it driving, others have it on approach, and yet others experience them on putts. For our part, in this best putters for yips review, we’ll be focusing on finding the best putters for yips in an attempt to find a mechanical solution to what is, according to all studies, a neurological problem.

What is the Yips?

Now, for those of you not in the know, the yips are not characteristic only of golf (though golf does seem to have the most sufferers, probably to the nature of the activity). In darts, they’re known as “dartitis”; in snooker, they’re called “cueitis”; archers call them “archer panic”, while shooters name them “flinching”, and baseball pitchers use terms such as “Steve Bias disease” or “the creature”. 

Whatever the name, they all refer to the same problem, which is characterised by sudden and involuntary movement of one’s hands, wrists, forearms (or all of them combined) that disrupts the game, and will go unnoticed most of the time. Tommy Armour, who coined the term “yip” (way back in the 1920s) described it as a “brain spasm”, and as it would appear, he wasn’t far off.

Different Descriptions

The most common misconception people have about the yips is that it’s just some sort of choking when under pressure, but it’s not. Although pressure and anxiety can indeed worsen it, it’s known to have happened to golfers in all kinds of circumstances, even on the practice green.

Some golfers resort to bracing and/or anchoring the putter to get rid of the yips, others become more creative (Johnny Miller, for example, used to dab some red nail polish on the grip and focus on that instead of the ball or the head).

However, with the 2016 ban on anchoring, this is no longer a viable option. The trick that might work for some of you is to focus your eyes and your attention on anything to keep you from anticipating the stroke (or pitch, or throw, whatever sport you’re yipping in).

That covers the psychological side of it, whereas for the mechanical, what might help is finding a nice heavy putter to stabilize your hands as much as possible. The tendency of golfers who used to anchor their putters to go for balanced models might be indicative of the right way to go.

Best Putters for Yips Comparison Table

Image

Name

Pros

Cons

Rating

Boccieri D3-DF Heavy Putter

Boccieri D3-DF Heavy Putter

  • Reasonably priced
  • Customizable shaft length
  • Black matte finish looks nice
  • Available only in RH
SeeMore Pure Center Blade Putter
  • Easy to align
  • Lots of customization options
  • An all-round performer
  • Yippers might not even need the alignment aids
Ping Sigma G Doon Putter

Ping Sigma G Doon Putter

  • Tons of forgiveness
  • The big head looks nice
  • Well-balanced
  • Some might find the feel a bit too firm
Odyssey O-Works Tank #7 Putter
  • Soft and buttery feel
  • Very stable through the stroke
  • Great roll across the board
  • Not everyone will like the looks
Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance Putter

Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance Putter

  • Surprisingly soft feel
  • Excellent balance
  • Good distance control
  • Pricey
Cleveland TFI 2135 8.0 Counterbalanced Putter
  • Foolproof setup
  • Nice, solid feel
  • Stable, smooth stroke
  • The colour-scheme might feel too busy for some
Ping Cadence TR Anser 2 CB Putter
  • Hard-to-miss sweet spot
  • Consistent distance
  • Tons of response
  • Some might prefer a softer feel

Best Putters for Yips Review

Down here, you can read the reviews of what we think are the best putters for golfers with the yips. As usual we've tried to get a mixed result with something for everyone, but in the end it will be up to you and how it feels on the course. Let’s get stuck in.

1. Boccieri D3-DF Heavy Putter

Our Rating:

Boccieri D3-DF Heavy Putter

Not many golfers like the D3-DF Heavy Putter by Bocccieri, but those who do love it. Commonly known as camelback, the D3-DF is a mallet-head with a double-bend shaft and a CNC milled face.

The head weighs a considerable 465 grams (give or take), and is counterweighted by 250 grams in the butt end of the shaft. Coupled with the dead weight (the shaft itself), this comes to around 900 grams of weight total (just shy of 32 ounces). 

The idea behind so much weight is to stabilize the hands by passivizing the wrists and give a smooth stroke from start to finish (which is a promise the D3-DF delivers on in full).

Another nice thing about this flatstick is that it has a number of stock shaft lengths available (32–36 inches), with the option to customize it further to suit your height and arm span (30–38 inches).

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonably priced
  • thumbs-o-up
    Customizable shaft length
  • thumbs-o-up
    Stainless steel assures the putter will have a long lifespan
  • thumbs-o-up
    Black matte finish looks nice

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Available only in RH
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not the prettiest putter out there
SeeMore Pure Center Blade Putter

The SeeMore Pure Center Blade is pretty much what it reads on the tin – a center-shafted blade putter. The center shaft goes a long way to stabilizing the putter which complements the added weight if you decide to go for a counterbalanced design (the standard PCB isn’t counterweighted).

Speaking of which, the standard stainless steel head (cast, with a milled face) isn’t all that heavy, but you have the option to add weight through customization. This also applies to lie, shaft length, grips - basically anything that can be customized, SeeMore will customize.

However, what sets the PCB, and all the other SeeMore putters for that matter, apart is the RifleScope alignment system, which is one of the most foolproof systems in the industry. In a nutshell, if you can get the red dot on the topline hidden underneath the shaft at address, you’re guaranteed to have the face square to the hole.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Ridiculously easy to align
  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonably priced
  • thumbs-o-up
    Lots of customization options
  • thumbs-o-up
    An all-round performer
  • thumbs-o-up
    Face-balanced design helps with SBST strokes

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not everyone will appreciate the center-shafted design
  • thumbs-o-down
    Yippers might not even need the alignment aids

3. Ping Sigma G Doon Putter

Our Rating:

Ping Sigma G Doon Putter

The Ping Sigma G range comes with 16 head designs, something to suit almost every type of stroke and to suit different eyes

The Doon, much like the rest of the range, features Ping’s True Roll face, which goes a long way to ensuring the ball speed is consistent across the face. In other words, whatever part of the face you catch the ball with, you can still get the same distance on the roll.

As for the Doon specifically, it’s slightly firmer than the rest of the family, producing a somewhat metallic click at impact. Plus, it’s only one of the two counterbalanced models in the range (along with the Kinloch CB), which is great for any golfer looking for maximum stability (including golfers suffering from the yips).

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Tons of forgiveness
  • thumbs-o-up
    Excellent consistency, quick and strong roll
  • thumbs-o-up
    The big head looks nice
  • thumbs-o-up
    Well-balanced
  • thumbs-o-up
    The silver finish looks gorgeous

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might find the feel a bit too firm
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not as funky-looking as Wolverine, but still weird-shaped
Odyssey O-Works Tank #7 Putter

Depending on your stroke, you can go either for the Odyssey O-Works Tank #7 (for straight-back-straight-through) or #1 (for arc strokes). Other than that, the two models are pretty much the same. Both head shapes have been seen previously on tour, but they’re slightly larger, which is evident when you put it down next to the ball.

The fanged mallet shape of the #7 is a bit unusual, and it might take some getting used to, but it does have a nice balance and alignment aids, which should appeal to yippers from a psychological side. As for the mechanical aspect, the long grip and added weight make the Tank counterbalanced, which passivizes the wrists and steadies the hands on the dance floor.

Another great feature on the Tank (and the entire O-Works family, for that matter) is the microhinge face insert, with about a hundred of teeny-tiny stainless-steel hinges, which are there to give the ball a quick bounce and send it rolling as soon as possible.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Soft and buttery feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Very stable through the stroke
  • thumbs-o-up
    Great roll across the board

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not everyone will like the looks

5. Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance Putter

Our Rating:

Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance Putter

The Futura 6M Dual Balance, as you may have already guessed, is just a counterbalanced version of the standard Futura 6M, but besides the added weight in head and the butt of the shaft (50 grams), the tech behind both is the same. 

The head is crafted by fusing a 303 stainless steel head with a matching insert, aiming to soften up the feel without losing the feedback. Coupled with the added weight, this should appeal to golfers with the yips, as it promotes a smooth and stable stroke and consistent roll with only nominal effort on your part.

The one major downside is the price tag, which we feel is inflated on account of the name, but other than that, the putter is great, and Scotty fans will certainly appreciate it.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Plenty forgiving on mishits
  • thumbs-o-up
    Surprisingly soft feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Excellent balance
  • thumbs-o-up
    Good distance control

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Pricey
Cleveland TFI 2135 8.0 Counterbalanced Putter

The TFI 2315 8.0 from Cleveland is a nice choice primarily for golfers having problems with aligning the putt, but it should also appeal to those trying to find a good putter for the yips (on account of its counterbalanced design).

The added weight in the head and the grip end of the shaft goes a long way to stabilizing the stroke and calming the hands – it probably won’t eliminate the disruptive movement characteristic of the yips, but it should mitigate its effects.

Other than that, the TFI 2135 8.0 comes with two major selling points, both making a part of the name. The TFI refers to the True Feel Innovation, which combines the copper-infused aluminum face with a copolymer insert, giving excellent consistency across the face and a feel that’s neither too soft nor too firm.

The other part – 2135, refers to the raised sightline (exactly to the equator of a USGA-regulations ball), which helps with alignment, making the position of your eyes in relation to the ball irrelevant.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Lots of forgiveness on off-center hits
  • thumbs-o-up
    Foolproof setup
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice, solid feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Stable, smooth stroke
  • thumbs-o-up
    Good distance control
  • thumbs-o-up
    Sort of old-school look

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    The colour-scheme might feel too busy for some
Ping Cadence TR Anser 2 CB Putter

As you may have already inferred from reading the name, the Ping Cadence TR Anser 2 CB is a counterbalanced take on the classic Anser-style shape. There are two other flavours to the Anser 2 CB, the Anser 2 Traditional and the Anser 2 Heavy (the differences are pretty much self-explanatory).

The Anser 2 CB is different from its two brethren in that it has 50 grams of added weight and the longer grip, which goes a long way to helping you stabilize the stroke. It has a somewhat firmer feel than you might be used to in today’s putters, but on the flipside, it’s very informative.

Much like the rest of the range, the Anser 2 CB comes with the True Roll insert, which helps keep the ball speed consistent irrespective of which part of the face you catch it on. In other words, even if you hit it toward the heel or toe, you can still get away with it, which makes it a nice putter for the yips.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonably priced
  • thumbs-o-up
    Consistent distance across the board
  • thumbs-o-up
    Hard-to-miss sweet spot
  • thumbs-o-up
    Tons of response
  • thumbs-o-up
    The finish looks nice

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might prefer a softer feel

Conclusion

In conclusion, if you’ve missed an occasional 6-foot putt, especially under pressure, chances are you don’t really have the yips (if you do, then you know you have them beyond any shadow of a doubt). The yips aren’t really about missing putts from 6 feet, they’re more about not being able to see any way of making the putt or hitting it within the tap-in zone.

For those of you who recognize themselves in this, we hope that some of the putters from our list can help you get back on track. Keep in mind, though, that even the best putters for yips aren’t worth a plugged nickel unless you work on your stroke, so don’t stop practising.

That said, feel free to leave us a comment and tell us your experience with the yips, if and how you overcame the problem. Until then, keep calm and sink the putt!

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Ryan S

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