Best Wedges of All Time Reviews

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Picking the best wedge for the current year is a thankless task, so you can probably imagine how enormous the burden of picking the best wedges of all time is. Everyone, from absolute novices to the veterans of many a tourney will have their own two cents on it. Keep in mind that we’re dealing with wedges in general, and not particular types of wedges (i. e. pitching, gap, sand, or lob).

What Plays in?

The main criterion for making this list was the general consensus of the community (so, internet forums, golf clubs, country clubs, sales, the whole shebang), and there were indeed a couple of series that floated to the top on first skim (we’ll get to that in a bit).

Even so, there are multiple groups within the community. For example, low handicappers prefer one wedge, high handicappers another; some stick to the couple of big names, others mix it up a little bit, and yet others fully customize their bags, from the grips to the soles. So, the second criterion was the versatility (which, again, ties into how popular the wedge is).

Thirdly, and this plays into the part about customizing quite nicely, we took only the off-the-rack stuff into consideration. In other words, we took the stuff that fits the greatest number of players, with respect to their anatomy. Sure enough, if you get fitted, that will tweak your game to some extent, but it won’t shave off five or six strokes like if it were a magic wand.

Moreover, most golfers will find out that they conform to the off-the-rack clubs, seeing as manufacturers are sort of forced to build them according to the average male specs. As an aside, if you do have it in your budget to get fit, then, by all means, do so.

Popular Demand

In addition, the longevity also played a role in our selection, not in the sense of the durability (though it’s definitely a feature you’d want to check out before deciding), but more in the sense how long a particular model or series remains popular and/or unchanged (why fix it if it ain’t broke, eh?).

Of course, seeing as it’s so much easier talking about entire series rather than specific part of one in this context, we’ll mostly be discussing those. If a particular loft or bounce pops up that deserves a mention, we’ll be sure to do so.

Golf Wedges Comparison Table

Image

Name

Pros

Cons

Rating

Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Cavity Back Wedge
  • Forgiving
  • Great in wet conditions
  • Versatile sole design
  • None
Titleist Vokey SM6 F Grind Wedge
  • Customization options
  • Progressive CG
  • Impressive spin
  • Not really meant for high handicappers
Ping Eye2 Wedge
  • Plenty of grooves
  • Great distance control
  • Ideal for aggressive players
  • Not that great for pitch shots
Mizuno MP T-Series
  • Nice and sharp grooves
  • Nice feel, well-balanced
  • Fits all types of players
  • You do need to be fairly on the button to make it work
Cobra Trusty Rusty Wedge
  • Plenty of spin
  • Versatile bounce
  • Balanced and steady feel
  • Feels somewhat stiff on impact
Nike VR X3X Wedge
  • Great GI wedge
  • Nice, rustic look
  • Plays great from tight lies
  • Discontinued
Callaway Mack Daddy Forged Series
  • Customization options
  • Very versatile
  • Solid, beefy feel
  • Small profile

The 7 Best Wedges of All Time

If you feel confident we’ve covered the basics, feel free to continue reading our list of the 7 top rated golf wedges of all time.

Our Rating:

Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Cavity Back Wedge

Just mention the Cleveland 588 and any thread discussing the best wedge ever is over. Not only have these puppies survived through various iterations since 1988, but it’s been the best-selling golf club on various occasions. This is, if you will, the benchmark when it comes to wedges.

The most popular iteration seems to be the 588 Forged, mostly for its soft feel and plenty forgiveness, as well as a nice bounce selection. It’s made for delicate feel about the greens, and will stop you on a dime or run you if needed.

On the flipside, if you’d rather have something heavier, but with mad spin, then the RTX-3 CB seems the way to go. Granted, the RTX-3 CB is still somewhat fresh, so we’ll have to wait and see how it does in the long run. So far, so good.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    More forgiving than your local pastor
  • thumbs-o-up
    Great in wet conditions
  • thumbs-o-up
    Fairly versatile sole design
  • thumbs-o-up
    The RTX grooves pack a lot of bite

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    None

See a full review of the Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 wedge here.

Our Rating:

Titleist Vokey SM6 F Grind Wedge

If you asked a Titleist fan what the best wedge ever is, he or she would say the Spin Milled 6 without missing a beat, and with good reason.

The SM6 is simply the newest iteration of the SM5, and the earlier SM4, building upon and improving on their design and reputation.

This is the wedge you’ll want to go to for extreme spin and dialling in the ball, provided you’re a low handicapper. The compact profile and the higher-up Center of Gravity (CG) make it less than ideal for beginners.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice feel, plenty of customization options
  • thumbs-o-up
    Progressive CG
  • thumbs-o-up
    Impressive spin thanks to the new and improved microgroove design
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice looking, available in three finishes

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not really meant for high handicappers

See a full review of the wedge here.

Our Rating:

Ping Eye2 Wedge

Ever since its inception, the Ping Eye2 wedge has been well-received by both pros and amateurs, and with good reason. 

They act pretty well in the higher lofts, and the sand wedge has an absolute beauty of a bounce for any bunker.

The original Eye2 was a near perfection, but the new Glide ES (sort of a revived Eye2) has had a lukewarm reception, at best. On the flipside, the Glide 2.0 seems to be the new cool kid in the class.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Plenty of grooves for extreme spin
  • thumbs-o-up
    Great distance control, let’s you stop on the greens quickly
  • thumbs-o-up
    Ideal for aggressive players
  • thumbs-o-up
    Plays beautifully out of bunkers

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Some players complain about the too high a bounce
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not that great for pitch shots

Our Rating:

Mizuno MP T-Series

Whether you’re a high, mid, or low handicapper, there’s something for you in the Mizuno T-Series of wedges.

The T in the name stands for its teardrop profile, which should suit those who prefer a flat leading edge coupled with a nice and square high toe.

These aren’t exactly GI wedges, but you do get plenty of spin and control on the T11 model, and the wedge plays beautifully out of thicker and/or wet grass. It’s not the most forgiving wedge ever to be made, but the pros definitely outweigh the cons.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Great for all types of players
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice and sharp grooves
  • thumbs-o-up
    Looks nice on the address
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice feel, well-balanced

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    You do need to be fairly on the button to make it work

Our Rating:

Cobra Trusty Rusty Wedge

The Trusty Rusty takes its name after the fact it will rust over time as its finish wears off.

It has machine-milled grooves that generate lots of spin, giving you pretty controlled and predictable flight. It’s fairly forgiving on off-centre hits, though it does feel a bit stiff on impact.

Another major selling point is its Tri-bounce sole, which foregoes the decision between high and low bounce, and incorporates both in the center and high/toe areas, respectively.

After more than two decades on the market without losing an inch of its appeal, the Trusty Rusty makes the cut for one of the best golf wedges of all time, no questions asked.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Plays nice from uneven lies, rough, or sand
  • thumbs-o-up
    Plenty of spin for better control
  • thumbs-o-up
    Versatile bounce, digs and slides depending on what you need
  • thumbs-o-up
    Balanced and steady feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Looks nice, especially when it ages

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Feels somewhat stiff on impact

See a full review of the wedge here.

Our Rating:

Nike VR X3X Wedge

In 2016, Nike announced they’d be moving out of the golf business, joining another great manufacturer, Scratch Golf.

Both deserve a place on our list, but seeing Nike’s exit from the scene is fresher and they are easier to come by, we had to make a decision.

The Nike wedges are definitely forgiving, which garnered many fans among high and mid handicappers, and it plays great out of bunkers. More importantly, they’re head-heavy, which gives you just enough assistance with your swing.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Great GI (game-improvement) wedge
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice, rustic look (designed to rust)
  • thumbs-o-up
    Plays great from tight lies

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Discontinued
Callaway Mack Daddy Forged Series

Fairly recently, the Mack Daddy series from Callaway has been crowned with the MD3 wedge, which is, essentially, a wider iteration of the Mack Daddy 2.

As far as the MD3 milled Grind vs. MD Forged debate goes, the main difference being the leading edge, which is straighter and tighter to the ground on the latter. The feel is also a bit meatier, if you will, with the forged.

However, what connects the entire Mack Daddy line is the versatility with which all of them play. As far as which the best Callaway wedge ever is, the MD Forged definitely holds the throne, though the MD3 looks to supplant it in short order.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Plenty of customization options
  • thumbs-o-up
    Very versatile
  • thumbs-o-up
    Solid, beefy feel (meatiest on the MD Forged)

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Small profile (especially on the MD 2)

See a full review of the wedge here.

Conclusion

So, there you have it – the seven best wedges ever (with plenty of caveats). Granted, this list is neither comprehensive nor definitive, and you can disagree with it to a degree or wholly.

However, there is no denying that Cleveland and Vokey are the names you’ll come across most often when discussing this topic, whether it’s a thread on a golfer's’ forum or an article like this.

After all, just as with any golf club, from drivers and fairways, through irons and wedges and all the way to putters, the only thing that should matter is the way it feels in your hands.

If none of the names you read here seem like something you’d play, more power to you – go with the gear that will help you tweak your game, not something a random person on the internet recommends. Above all, keep in mind that this is just a game however clichéd that may sound, so have fun, and may the course be with you!

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