Cobra Women’s Max Wedge Review

Cobra Women’s Max Wedge Review

If you’re looking for some game-improvement wedges, or better yet, an entire irons set that won’t break the bank, you might want to check out the Cobra Max women’s set. Sure enough, it won’t make you play like Nancy Lopez, but should help you shave a couple of strokes off your approach game. Continue reading this Cobra Women’s Max wedge review to get some more information about the club.

If you’re a Cobra fan, then you are probably aware that there already is a Cobra Max range of clubs, launched at pretty much the same time as the strikingly similar King F6 range. Speaking of, both ranges, or families if you like, are designed with forgiveness in mind, and both have versions for women.

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Cobra Women’s Max: As Forgiving as Your Local Pastor

When discussing the Cobra Women’s Max wedges, it’s important to point out that this is not a standalone line of wedges. Rather, these puppies are designed to go with the Max irons and complement them. The wedges come in two possible configurations, either with the Women’s Max Combo Set or with the Women’s Max Complete Set.

The Women’s Max Combo Set

The former is a 12-piece kit that consists of hybrids, irons, and wedges (so, technically, it’s an iron set), and includes: 4H, 5H, 6H, and 7H, as well as 5–9 irons, a PW, a GW, and an SW.

The Women’s Max Complete Set

Conversely, the latter is a full kit (also 12-piece) that includes a stripped-down version of the iron set. Here’s what’s included: a 460cc driver, 3F and 5F, 4H, 5H, and 6H, as well as 7–9 irons, PW, SW, plus a putter. Obviously, the Combo Set is the cheaper one, although the Complete Set does come off as a better value pack. It’s up to you.

So, as you might gather, it’s a poor loft selection when it comes to wedges, but on the flipside, you get pretty much all you need to get you on the right foot. This angle should be appealing to beginners, and really complements nicely the overall theme of forgiveness and higher launch capabilities of the Cobra Max range.

Heads

Now, the interesting point about the Cobra Max range, when it comes to irons, is that three different head designs vary through the lofts. It’s a bit overwhelming, but not as near as the four profiles that come in the King F6 line.

The Speed Channel Face

The manufacturer likes pointing out four points about the Cobra King Max clubs, and these apply to both the women’s line and the vanilla. The first is the Speed Channel Face, which is designed to sit behind the face and reduce the weight. This allows for more flex across the face, and, in turn, more speed for greater distance even if you miss the sweet spot.

The Hollow Cavity Design

The second thing is the Hollow Cavity Design, which is only present in long to mid irons (so 4 through 8), but it does have some bearing on the wedges, as the clubs in the range are designed to play in concert with one another. What this does is use a dual cavity design to move the CG slightly low and to the back, which additionally improves forgiveness and adds a bit more lift.

The Low CG Zone Weighting

The third point worth mentioning is the Low CG Zone Weighting, and you can see it right across the board. What the engineers at the RD department over at Cobra did was remove some weight from the crown and move it, you guessed it, low and to the back. Again, just like with the Dual Cavity Design in the longer irons, this helps with the launch and forgiveness as it increases the MOI (Moment of Inertia).

The Offset Design

Finally, the fourth selling point of the Cobra Max Women’s wedges (and irons) is the Offset Design, which is quite substantial in the lower lofts, and then all but disappears when you get into the gap and sand wedge. The idea is to help you square the face at impact and reducing, if not outright eliminating that slice that’s been bugging you for ages.

Cobra Women’s Max Wedge

The Encore: Progressive Spin Technology

As an additional note, Cobra made sure that each specific iron, from the stronger lofted ones to the sand wedge, features optimized grooves for their respective tasks. This is what the manufacturer calls Progressive Spin Technology, and it’s exactly what it sounds like.

In a bit more detail, the long irons (4–6) make use of V-grooves so that you generate less spin and get more distance out of your strokes, while the shorter irons and the pitching wedge feature U-grooves to give you more bite and, in turn, better flight control on your approach shots.

Finally, the gap and sand wedge, the black sheep of the family, feature the same U-grooves, but spaced wider, so that you get that extra spin for shots around and onto the green.

Shafts and Grips

All the technologies we discussed so far are not exclusive to the Cobra Women’s Max clubs, as they were used in the vanilla Cobra Max range. However, what allows the manufacturer to recommend them to female players is the flex and weight of their stock shafts.

The wedges (and the entire set, for that matter) come with the Matrix White Tie X4 shafts, which go an additional step to enable you to get more launch and better control. The stock option is graphite, to favour players with lower swing speeds, but you can also get it in steel if you prefer.

The manufacturer chose a nice grip to complement the overall theme of forgiveness, as the Women's Max Winn Wrap. It’s quite responsive, and should perform decently in all types of weather.

Wedges One by One

Here’s a more in-depth description about the individual Cobra Women’s Max wedges.

Pitching Wedge

The Cobra Women’s Max pitching wedge features a thick top line and a fairly deep cavity back, which is a design it shares with the 9-iron. The cavity back comes off particularly deep when you take and compare it to its King F6 counterpart. Both are forgiving, but the Max more so.

The loft on this puppy is a strong 45 degrees, and coupled with the U-grooves, gives you plenty of air to cover the distance. As noted earlier, all of the irons come with a decent offset, the one on the pitching wedge being 2.8mm (or about 0.11 inches), which is nothing to write home about, but it does help in two ways.

One, it allows you to better square up the face, reducing the chances of hitting a fade or a slice; and two, it helps you get a bit more lift at impact, so the ball travels farther. With a C5 swingweight, it’s pretty lightweight, and should optimize performance for slow swingers.

On that note, you do get a nice feel at impact, as well as plenty of good feedback on both center-hits and mishits. Although, it does sound a bit hollow and less appealing than what you hear on the stronger-lofted irons in the range.

Gap Wedge

The Cobra Women’s Max gap wedge (50) is where the range starts switching into a more blade-like design, aiming to combine forgiveness with playability. Like the entire irons set, the gap wedge also carries a slight offset (1.0mm or approximately 0.03 inches), which really does look nice when you look down at it next to the ball.

The grooves, as mentioned earlier, are the same as on the pitching wedge, though spaced wider apart, the idea being to give you more teeth for better distance control on approach shots. With a wide sole design and standard-to-high bounce, this puppy plays all sorts of lies.

The feel is quite solid, though not too soggy, and you know whether your hit’s gone awry. Even if you do catch the ball towards the heel or toe, you can probably get away with it thanks to the forgiving design we already discussed when talking about the set as a whole.

Sand Wedge

Just like the gap wedge, the Cobra Max Sand wedge features only a slight offset of about 0.8mm (or circa 0.03 inches), which helps with playability. It features a special (“specialist”, as Cobra terms it), sole design that allows it more playability and enhanced control around the greens and on bunker shots. This should definitely appeal to high handicappers and aspiring mid cappers having trouble with getting out of greenside bunkers.

The feel is definitely solid, and you can distinctly hear a nice, muted click on virtually every shot. The feedback is definitely up to scratch here, and you’ll know it right away if your stroke is on point or not. On that note, like the rest of the range, the SW is quite forgiving, and at times you might get the feeling that the ball is trying to right itself in flight.

Pros

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    Workable from all sorts of lies
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    Good flight control, enhanced consistency
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    Nice looking, albeit not from a puritan standpoint
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    Plenty of forgiveness on mishits
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    Soft feel, but not too soggy; a bit on the heavy side
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    Ideal for mid to high cappers, especially those who tend to take big divots
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    Fairly inexpensive, solid all-rounders

Cons

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    Poor choice of lofts for wedges, but nothing crippling
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    Some golfers might find the graphite shafts to be too light
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    Not all ladies need the higher launch

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The Final Verdict

So, the bottom line is, if you want forgiveness in your wedges and irons, go for either the Cobra Women’s Max or Cobra King F6. However, if you’re working with a somewhat of a tight budget, then you definitely want to go with the former. With these puppies, you should be getting that much needed boost on launch so many slow swingers suffer from as well as plenty of forgiveness on off-center hits.

Of course, the fact that these are advertised as women’s wedges doesn’t mean they’re limited to the ladies – anyone looking for a game-improving set could profit from playing them. Whatever you decide, keep in mind that the best way to find your ideal wedge is to actually take it on a test drive and see how it feels. Fairways and greens!

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Ryan S

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