Best Golf Putter for High Handicappers or Beginners Review

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Best Golf Putter for High Handicappers or Beginners Review

Whether you’re a high handicapper with some experience or just getting started, you’ve probably thought I really need something to shave some strokes off my game. Now, the first thing most folks will try is improving their long and approach game, but they do this without considering the fact that well over a third of all strokes you take are on the putting green. With that in mind, this best golf putter for high handicappers or beginners review will be looking at what we think are the best putters for your situation.

What To Look for In a Putter?

Before we move on, however, let’s just briefly go over the features you should be looking for when shopping for a game-improvement flatstick. What you want, first and foremost, is a good alignment system. If you can align the putt correctly, that’s half the battle won.

Another thing you’ll want is enhanced MOI (Moment of Inertia). What this does is increase the stability and forgiveness on off-centre hits. Look for face-balanced putters, either center shafted or heel shafted, but with a plumber’s neck. Counterweight putters are also a good choice if you want forgiveness and stability.

Best Golf Putter for High Handicappers or Beginners Comparison Table

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Name

Pros

Cons

Rating

Odyssey White Hot RX 2-Ball V-Line
  • Ridiculously easy to align
  • Tons of forgiveness
  • Inexpensive
  • Some might find the insert a bit too soft
Callaway Odyssey O-Works Tank #7
  • Reasonably priced
  • Tight and consistent roll
  • Soft and informative feel
  • Might be a touch too light for a tank
Bettinardi Inovai Series
  • Good visual cues
  • Very soft feel
  • Enhanced MOI helps with forgiveness
  • Would be nice if it came with adjustable weights
TaylorMade Spider Tour Platinum
  • Accurate from all distances
  • Foolproof setup
  • Hard-to-miss sweet spot
  • Some might want a softer feel
SeeMore Original Milled FGP Black Mallet
  • Smooth rolls from all distances
  • Affordable
  • Semi-firm feel
  • No everyone will like the looks
Titleist/Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance

Titleist/Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance

  • Excellent balance
  • Stable throughout the stroke
  • Nice, buttery feel
  • Costs a pretty penny
Ping Cadence TR B65
  • Adjustable shaft length
  • Excellent distance control
  • Nice, conventional looks
  • Could have a stronger feedback

Best Golf Putter for High Handicappers or Beginners Review

Although it’s a thankless task recommending something as personal as a putter, especially to those seeking something to improve their short game, we shortlisted 7 of what we think are the best choices in this regard. Of course, we’ll include a little bit of something for everybody and their pocket books.

Odyssey White Hot RX 2-Ball V-Line

The Odyssey White Hot RX 2-Ball V-Line, much like the rest of the White Hot RX family, comes with one of the softest inserts money can buy. So, if you’re looking for a soft-insert putter for a high handicapper, you can’t get much better than this.

Moreover, once you factor in the very reasonable price, you’ve got yourself a nice entry-level putter that won’t break the bank.

Granted, despite its earlier popularity, the 2-Ball design is a bit of an acquired taste these days, but it makes aligning the putt so darn easy, making it rather appealing for those players looking for a boost in confidence. On that note, being a mallet, the 2-ball favours a straight-back-straight-through stroke.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Ridiculously easy to align
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    Tons of forgiveness
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    Ideal for golfers who putt using SBST stroke
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    Plays beautifully on fast greens
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    Inexpensive

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    The 2-ball design takes a bit of getting used to
  • thumbs-o-down
    Not for players who like to stand close to the ball
  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might find the insert a bit too soft
Callaway Odyssey O-Works Tank #7

Two things make the Callaway Odyssey O-Works Tank 7 a great candidate for the title of the best high handicap putter – the Microhinge insert and tank Counterbalance.

The Versa alignment system is also nothing to sneer at, especially if the trouble in your putts isn’t with the wrists, but the eyes.

The insert is an interesting innovation from Odyssey – basically, you get about a hundred of tiny stainless steel hinges in the place of grooves (hence the name). These flex as you hit the ball, imparting a nice amount of topspin to get it rolling in short order.

Moreover, they also help with consistency on mishits, so even if you catch it a bit on the heel or toe-side, you can still get away with it and roll the ball within tap-in range.

Pros

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    Reasonably priced
  • thumbs-o-up
    Very stable throughout the stroke
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    Tight and consistent roll
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    Soft and informative feel
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    Nice visual cues

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Might be a touch too light for a tank

Our Rating:

Bettinardi Inovai Series

If your putt game is suffering due to a lack of stability in your strokes, then the Inovai Series from Bettinardi might just be the thing for you.

The entire line is essentially one single mallet in four different flavours (with potential to grow) – traditional, center shaft, counter balanced, and left handed.

One major feature of the Inovai is Bettinardi’s F. I. T. milling, which makes one of the softest faces out there. It’s ideal for those who tend to play aggressively and seek a responsive flatstick (i. e. more advanced players). Conversely, the somewhat heavier head and stainless steel wings in the back go a long way to enhancing the MOI, which appeals to higher cappers.

Still, these features don’t cancel each other out, but rather work together to make a versatile mallet that should suit all walks of golf. If you’re determined to find the one to help you 3-putt less, try the counterbalanced variant before all else.

Pros

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    Good visual cues
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    Very soft feel
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    Suits all sorts of golfers, from low to high handicappers
  • thumbs-o-up
    The size and shape instil confidence at address
  • thumbs-o-up
    Enhanced MOI helps with forgiveness

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Would be nice if it came with adjustable weights
  • thumbs-o-down
    A bit pricey (not as the Studio Stock series, but still)
TaylorMade Spider Tour Platinum

The TaylorMade Spider Tour is a great choice if you’re looking for a mid-priced putter for a high handicapper, though even more advanced players are likely to find it worth their while. Two features define the Spider Tour Platinum – no-frill visual cues and the angled grooves on its face.

As noted, TaylorMade went with being pragmatic on the alignment aids on the Platinum – no bells, no whistles, just a single contrastive alignment line and a distinctive head shape to make it interesting to look at. On that note, the head size is rather confidence-instilling at address, which helps winning the first half of the battle.

The second half is won by the weight pods located at the back of the head, which help increase the MOI, increasing the stability and forgiveness. Coupled with the angled grooves, this gives you tight and consistent rolls almost irrespective of what part of the face you hit the ball with.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Sweet, tight roll across the board
  • thumbs-o-up
    Accurate from all distances
  • thumbs-o-up
    Foolproof setup
  • thumbs-o-up
    Neither too soft nor too firm feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Hard-to-miss sweet spot
  • thumbs-o-up
    Confidence-boosting looks

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Not everyone will like the head shape
  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might want a softer feel
SeeMore Original Milled FGP Black Mallet

If you’re a type of high handicapper who likes milled putters, then any flatstick from the SeeMore range should be right up your alley. However, if you twisted our arms, we’d have to recommend the Original Milled Series FGP as one of, if not the best flatstick for high handicappers.

The FGP comes in two flavours, blade and mallet, both center shaft (like most of the SeeMore range, actually), and you can also order it in the counterbalance variant, if you’re having trouble with stability.

However, what really sets the FGP and all SeeMore putters apart from the competition is the RifleScope alignment technology, which makes aligning the putt ridiculously easy. Seriously, if you’re an absolute novice to golf, the FGP makes for a nice, budget-friendly option.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    One of the best alignment systems
  • thumbs-o-up
    Custom order counterbalanced available
  • thumbs-o-up
    Smooth and tight rolls from all distances
  • thumbs-o-up
    Affordable
  • thumbs-o-up
    Semi-firm feel with a good amount of feedback

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    If you can get past the looks, there aren’t really any cons

6. Titleist/Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance

Our Rating:

Titleist/Scotty Cameron Futura 6M Dual Balance

The Futura 6M Dual Balance by Scotty Cameron is a great counterbalance putter for high handicappers with deep pockets.

If you’ve been putting for some time now, then you’re probably aware that some OEMs charge a bit extra for just the name. Then again, the Futura 6M DB is undeniably quality-made, so the charge is somewhat justified (especially if you’re a Titleist or Scotty fan).

What you get here is a regular Futura 6M flatstick, but with 50 grams of added weight in the head, counterbalanced by as much load in the shaft butt. What this does is increase the MOI and stability, giving you a more forgiving putter than the one we started with. 

Couple that with the rather effective alignment system, and you’ve got yourself a nice high capper’s putter. Of course, the stainless-steel body/stainless-steel insert combo is nothing to discount, either (no pun intended).

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    More forgiving than your local pastor or imam
  • thumbs-o-up
    Excellent balance
  • thumbs-o-up
    Stable throughout the stroke
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice, buttery feel
  • thumbs-o-up
    Helpful alignment system

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Costs a pretty penny
  • thumbs-o-down
    Some golfers might find the rear weights a bit off-putting

Our Rating:

Ping Cadence TR B65

If you’re looking for the best midsize mallet for a high handicapper, then the Ping Cadence TR B65 might just be the right thing for you.

The putter comes in two similar flavours, Traditional and Heavy, the only difference being, obviously, the weight. The latter is 25 grams heavier than the former, which weighs in at 340 grams (that’s just the head, not counting the dead weight).

What this added weight does is stabilize the putter, making the Heavy B65 (you’ll recognize it by the black inserts) better suited for slower strokes.

Conversely, the Traditional B65 (blue inserts) will fit mid-to-fast cadence strokes, but both are designed with SBST putters in mind.

Pros

  • thumbs-o-up
    Adjustable shaft length (31 to 38 inches)
  • thumbs-o-up
    Excellent distance control
  • thumbs-o-up
    Variable-depth grooves help roll the ball faster
  • thumbs-o-up
    Nice, conventional looks
  • thumbs-o-up
    Reasonably priced
  • thumbs-o-up
    Reliable brand

Cons

  • thumbs-o-down
    Some might feel the shape is too much bladelike
  • thumbs-o-down
    Could have a stronger feedback

The Final Verdict

So, to recap, you should keep a few things in mind when looking for the best putter for high handicappers, more or less in order of importance – visual cues to help with aligning the putt, enhanced MOI (majority of mallets, face-balanced blades, center shaft or heel-shafted plumber’s neck, counterweight flatsticks, the works).

Before we say our greens and fairways, we should note that all of the putters on our list are yet to be discontinued and some are brand spanking new designs, chosen for the sake of being concise. Of course, there’s always the option of getting a used one off eBay. Yes, it’s risky given you get no warranty, but as long as the face doesn’t have a huge shiny spot in the middle, you’re probably safe. Fairways and greens!

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Ryan S

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